Pearl of Wisdom

in the book al-Tabdil, 'Ishaq al-Kindi who was the philosopher of his time in Iraq decided to write about contradictions in the Qur'an, and sat alone at home, preoccupied with it. One of his students visited Imam Hasan al-'Askari (AS) one day, and Abu Muhammad (AS) asked him, 'Is there not a Imam al-Hasan b. 'Ali al-'Askari (AS) rightly-guided man among you who can stop your teacher al-Kindi from this occupation that he has started with the Q]lr'an?' The student replied, 'We are his students; how can we object to him on this or on any other issue?' Abu Muhammad said, 'Will you then convey to him what I am telling him through you?' He said, 'Yes.' He (AS) said, 'Go to him and offer your service to him in his task, as though you want to acquaint yourself with it, and assist him therein. Once the acquaintance has developed, tell him, 'I have a question which I would like to ask you.' Certainly he will allow you. Then ask him, 'If someone who spoke only using [verses of] the Qu'ran was to come to you, would it be possible for his intended speech to be different to what you have understood it to mean?' He will indeed tell you that it is possible, because he is a man who comprehends if he listens. So, if he confirms this , then ask him, 'So that means that that which you have perceived might be different to what he meant, such that you may even be imposing a meaning to a word that is different to its original.' So the student went to al-Kindi, acquainted himself with him and politely mentioned the issue to him. He asked him to repeat the question, which he did. Then he pondered into it and thought it to be possible in language and acceptable conceptually. He then said, 'I swear by you to tell me from where you have learnt this [argument]?' He [the student] replied, 'It is just something that came to my mind so I presented it to you.' He said, 'No way. Someone like you could not have been guided to this kind of argument nor reached this position [in learning], so tell me from where you have come up with this?' He replied, 'Abu Muhammad ordered me to [tell you] this.' He then said, 'Now you have told me. Something like this could only have come from that household.' He then asked for some fire and burnt all that he had written.'

Abu al-Qasim al-Kufi
al-Manaqib li Ibn Shahr Ashub, v. 4, p. 424

Article Source

We acknowledge the Brother Hajj Ali Dirani for providing the original file containing the 'Asma ul Husna'. He can be contacted on

alameer282@gmail.com

The files you find here are NOT IN the Public domain, and the copy rights of the files still remain with the above author 

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The Holy Qur'an » Asma ul Husna » Al Hameed
Al Hameed E-mail

"O people! You are the ones who stand in need of Allah, while Allah is the self-Sufficient, the Praised One" (Quran, 35:15).

The root word of "al-Hameed" is hamd which means: praise, something more general than thanking. Al-Hameed is also al-Mamood, the Praised One.

Allah is al-Hameed due to praising His own Self since time immemorial, and also due to His servants praising Him. His qualities, such as His being Glorified and Exalted, are due to the fact that those who mention His Attribute glorify and exalt it.

Hamd in this context means enumerating or the attempt to enumerate the qualities of perfection conceived by those who praise Him. Al-Hameed grants you success and compliments you for it; He wipes out your sins and does not embarrass you by exposing them. He is Praised due to His merits. One whose beliefs, conduct, speech and action are praiseworthy is called hameed.

Such a description fits only the Messenger of Allah and those whose ranks are close to his from among Allah's prophets as well as others such as the friends of Allah, and the scholars. Each one of these is hameed with regard to his beliefs, conduct, deeds and statements.
 
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